Gov. Walker Signs Right to Work Legislation to Provide Workplace Freedom

Wisconsin is Truly Open for Business, WMC says

Brown Deer — Governor Scott Walker today expanded workplace freedom and improved the state’s business climate when he signed historic Right to Work legislation at Badger Meter.

“Governor Walker has put our state on the national landscape for job creation and business expansion by signing Right to Work legislation today,” said Kurt R. Bauer, WMC President/CEO.  WMC is Wisconsin’s chamber of commerce. “Governor Walker’s visionary leadership on reforming government unions, and now providing workplace freedom to private sector workers, has made our state a national leader in expanding economic freedom and prosperity for our citizens.”

Bauer added: “Combined with tax relief, regulation relief and lawsuit reform, the Walker era is an era of growth, hope and opportunity that has seen job creation go up and unemployment go down.”

On Monday, Walker signed the Right to Work bill at Badger Meter, 4545 W. Brown Deer Road, in Brown Deer. Passage of Right to Work is a top policy reform on the WMC public policy agenda. Right to Work prohibits firing workers who opt out of paying union dues.

WMC Vice President of Government Relations Scott Manley said that the Right to Work reforms significantly improves the business climate.

“Wisconsin is truly open for business,” Manley said. “Site selectors frequently just skip states that are not Right to Work. This reform puts us on the map for job creators. “

In late February, Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald (R-Juneau) and Assembly Speaker Robin Vos (R-Rochester) announced that they would bring the Legislature into extraordinary session to pass the workplace freedom reform. In 2011, the Legislature and the Governor enacted Right to Work for government unions in Wisconsin.

Wisconsin is the 25th state in the nation to pass private sector Right to Work legislation. In recent years, Indiana and Michigan passed Right to Work laws.

“We need to compete with our industrial competitors in the Upper Midwest,” Bauer said. “We hope to see Wisconsin compete and beat other states for jobs in the future with this reform.”